Skip to main content

4130 Truxel Road, Suite D Sacramento, CA 95834

4130 Truxel Road, Suite D Sacramento, CA 95834
916.928.8383

pic_3
1__Panamic_natomas_optometry___homepage1.png
slideshow1.png
Homepage_Banner_slideshow___should_be_already_cropped_to_size
5___looking_at_glasses___homepage1.png
Home » What's New » Protecting Your Eyes Against Harmful UV Radiation

Protecting Your Eyes Against Harmful UV Radiation

Everybody knows that the leading source of UV radiation is the sun. What many people don't realize is that the sun is not the only source of UV radiation. It can also come from sources such as welding machines and tanning beds. Furthermore, it is common knowledge that UV radiation can cause you a painful sunburn on your skin, but did you know that UV radiation can be dangerous for your eyes as well? It’s true! Too much UV radiation can give your eyes a kind of "sunburn of the eye," called photokeratitis, which can cause eyelid twitches, eye pain, and extreme sensitivity to bright light. In severe cases of UV radiation overexposure can also do permanent damage to your central vision, and the more your eyes are exposed to UV rays over time, the greater your chances become of developing serious problems with your eyes later in life, such as age related macular degeneration, cataracts and even cancer.

Fortunately, there are a number of steps that can be implemented to protect your eyes from the harmful effects of overexposure. The American Optometric Association suggests that sunglasses meant for extended outdoor exposure block 99-100 percent of UV-A and UV-B rays and 75-90 percent of all visible light. A hat or cap with a wide brim is also a great addition to protect your eyes from light that otherwise might not be blocked by your sunglasses. Wrap around sunglasses and contact lenses with UV protection are also great additions, as traditional sunglasses often let UV radiation around the edges that can still do damage to your eyes. Patients newly out of surgery for cataracts or those taking medicine that make the eyes more sensitive to light should be sure to take these same steps every time they go outside, no matter how long or short their time outside will be.

There are also certain situations in which sunglasses alone are not enough to protect your eyes. Arc welding and tanning beds are sources of direct light which require specialized eyewear to prevent extremely harmful side effects similar to looking directly into the sun. Snowfields, although they do not give off light of their own, do reflect a great deal of light that can also do similar damage to your eyes without appropriate specialized eyewear.

We are happy to announce that beginning May 11th, we will resume patient care!  Out of an abundance of caution, and guidance from various health agencies including the CMS, CDC, and CDPH, we will be following various safety protocols to protect the health and safety of our patients and staff.  The following protocols apply whether you are coming in for an eye exam, coming to pick out new glasses, or picking up glasses or contacts. Prior to entry there are 3 important steps:

1.  Bring your own mask: You must bring your own mask or face covering!  It is required to be worn at all times within the office (we are unable to provide masks from the office; if you do not bring a mask, we will have to reschedule your visit for a later date).

2.  Body temperature reading: Staff will be administering thermometer readings, and must be within normal range for entry into the office.

3.  Attest to good health: You must attest to good health, with no symptoms of fever, cough, shortness of breath, chills, sore throat, loss of taste/smell, and have not had contact with another person with COVID19 in the past 14 days.

 In addition, we will include limiting the number of patients in the office.  Therefore, you may be asked to call the office upon arrival, and may need to wait outside or in your car until you are called into the office.  Only patients will be allowed in the office (please have spouses, relatives, and friends wait outside of the office).  Exceptions include minors and dependents...may be accompanied by one adult parent or caretaker.

Sincerely,

The Natomas Optometry Team