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4130 Truxel Road, Suite D Sacramento, CA 95834

4130 Truxel Road, Suite D Sacramento, CA 95834
916.928.8383

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Photophobia

All types of light, ranging from interior lighting fixtures to streetlights and to the bright rays of the sun, have the potential to cause eye discomfort or pain. Photophobia refers to this ocular sensitivity to light.

An eye irritation or infection may cause photophobia. Other culprits include albinism, migraines, recent eye surgery or a variety of vision problems. In rare incidences, a congenital disease or certain medications may increase your sensitivity to light. The retina, which is the light-sensitive tissue at the back of your eye, is responsible for processing images. Treatment for photophobia involves treating the underlying cause that is disturbing the retina.

With light-sensitivity, the retina sends signals to the brain that are interpreted as discomfort or pain. The level of discomfort is in direct proportion with the strength of the light source, and it doesn’t matter if the light is man-made or natural.

Signs of Photophobia

When exposed to bright light, symptoms of itching, burning, wincing and squinting may all be experienced. Excessive tear production is another sign of photophobia.

Diagnosis and Treatment

If you suffer from light-sensitivity, you should schedule a consultation with your eye care professional.

People with lighter-colored eyes generally have more of a tendency towards photophobia, and intense light is likely to bother them. If you have light eyes, the lower quantity of pigment is less efficient at diffusing the light beams.

Photophobia may be temporary, or it can appear as a permanent side-effect of an underlying eye condition. The only way to treat photophobia is therefore to get to the root of the problem with a comprehensive eye exam. It’s important to mention any current medications to your eye doctor, as they may be associated with photophobia.

We are happy to announce that beginning May 11th, we will resume patient care!  Out of an abundance of caution, and guidance from various health agencies including the CMS, CDC, and CDPH, we will be following various safety protocols to protect the health and safety of our patients and staff.  The following protocols apply whether you are coming in for an eye exam, coming to pick out new glasses, or picking up glasses or contacts. Prior to entry there are 3 important steps:

1.  Bring your own mask: You must bring your own mask or face covering!  It is required to be worn at all times within the office (we are unable to provide masks from the office; if you do not bring a mask, we will have to reschedule your visit for a later date).

2.  Body temperature reading: Staff will be administering thermometer readings, and must be within normal range for entry into the office.

3.  Attest to good health: You must attest to good health, with no symptoms of fever, cough, shortness of breath, chills, sore throat, loss of taste/smell, and have not had contact with another person with COVID19 in the past 14 days.

 In addition, we will include limiting the number of patients in the office.  Therefore, you may be asked to call the office upon arrival, and may need to wait outside or in your car until you are called into the office.  Only patients will be allowed in the office (please have spouses, relatives, and friends wait outside of the office).  Exceptions include minors and dependents...may be accompanied by one adult parent or caretaker.

Sincerely,

The Natomas Optometry Team