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4130 Truxel Road, Suite D Sacramento, CA 95834

4130 Truxel Road, Suite D Sacramento, CA 95834
916.928.8383

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Home » Private: Your Eye Health » Eye Conditions » Ocular Hypertension

Ocular Hypertension

Ocular hypertension means the pressure in your eye, or your intraocular pressure (IOP), is higher than normal levels. Elevated IOP is also associated with glaucoma, which is a more serious condition that causes vision loss and optic nerve damage. By itself, however, ocular hypertension doesn't damage your vision or eyes.

Studies suggest that 2% to 3% of the general population may have ocular hypertension.

Signs and symptoms of ocular hypertension

You can't tell by yourself that you have ocular hypertension, because there are no outward signs or symptoms such as pain or redness. At each eye exam, your eyecare practitioner will measure your IOP and compare it to normal levels.

During routine eye exams, a tonometer is used to measure your IOP. Your eye typically is numbed with eye drops, and a small probe gently rests against your eye's surface. Other tonometers direct a puff of air onto your eye's surface to indirectly measure IOP.

What causes ocular hypertension?

Anyone can develop ocular hypertension, but it's most common in African-Americans, people over 40, those with family history of ocular hypertension or glaucoma, and those with diabetes or high amounts of nearsightedness.

IOP may become elevated due to excessive aqueous fluid production or inadequate drainage. Certain medications, such as steroids, and trauma can cause higher-than-normal IOP measurements as well.

Ocular hypertension treatment

People with ocular hypertension are at increased risk for developing glaucoma, so some eye doctors prescribe medicated eye drops to lower IOP in cases of ocular hypertension. Because these medications can be expensive and may have side effects, other eye doctors choose to monitor your IOP and only take action if you show signs of developing glaucoma. Because of the increased risk for glaucoma, you should have your IOP measured at the intervals your doctor recommends if you have ocular hypertension.

 

We are happy to announce that beginning May 11th, we will resume patient care!  Out of an abundance of caution, and guidance from various health agencies including the CMS, CDC, and CDPH, we will be following various safety protocols to protect the health and safety of our patients and staff.  The following protocols apply whether you are coming in for an eye exam, coming to pick out new glasses, or picking up glasses or contacts. Prior to entry there are 3 important steps:

1.  Bring your own mask: You must bring your own mask or face covering!  It is required to be worn at all times within the office (we are unable to provide masks from the office; if you do not bring a mask, we will have to reschedule your visit for a later date).

2.  Body temperature reading: Staff will be administering thermometer readings, and must be within normal range for entry into the office.

3.  Attest to good health: You must attest to good health, with no symptoms of fever, cough, shortness of breath, chills, sore throat, loss of taste/smell, and have not had contact with another person with COVID19 in the past 14 days.

 In addition, we will include limiting the number of patients in the office.  Therefore, you may be asked to call the office upon arrival, and may need to wait outside or in your car until you are called into the office.  Only patients will be allowed in the office (please have spouses, relatives, and friends wait outside of the office).  Exceptions include minors and dependents...may be accompanied by one adult parent or caretaker.

Sincerely,

The Natomas Optometry Team